• Armiel Chandler

Culture Spotlight Featuring Chinedu Omorie (West Africa Edition)


Chinedu Omorie, born in Nigeria and lives in Lagos the largest city and entertainment hub in Africa. He studied computer science at the Lagos state university and then proceeded to study digital film making at the New York film academy. His decision into film making is drawn from the desire to lend a voice to society with visual storytelling. He sees filmmaking as a tool for social change as expressed in most of his works. He has been privileged to work on projects like DRY, Silvertown, The Anomalous, Brown Envelop as well as KISSING SHADOWS. He has also the director of the award-winning lifestyle Docu-reality TV show ‘MAKE ME FABULOUS’.


In 2015 he was a panelist at the Scottish and Nigerian film common bond organized by British Council in collaboration with African In Motion film festival in Scotland, United Kingdom.


He served as a Technical Director for Nigeria’s most popular Film Academy, Del-YORK CREATIVE ACADEMY, and currently, the Project Director for None Governmental Organization concerned with maternal health issues in Africa, ‘Extended Hands Foundation’. He is married and has a son.


Tell us about your experience at the Hip Hop Film Festival?

I was greatly overwhelmed with excitement as I browsed through the list of selected films by the jury. Every film represents a voice and speaks out to the challenges in our sub-regional society. Every film has its uniqueness. like the mantra goes 'We rock, we don't stop'.


Why are stories from the culture important?

Stories from the culture are important because it motivates, empowers and invokes the desire to be creative and remain creative.there is no way you can be part of this great place and not find your voice.


What projects are you working on now?

I am currently on post for the project 'A Longer Night'. this is the story of a teenage boy who lost his virginity to his mother in a hostile (hostage) circumstance. That event completely turned his life into a nightmare. The question I tried to resolve is if he was able to come back to sanity.


Why do you think the Harlem Film House and Hip Hop Film Festival is important?

Top on my list of importance is the platform it creates for both old and new filmmakers in the sub-African region and the world at large. Hip Hop Film Festival has distinguished itself by expanding and creating a regional festival in order to extend opportunity to every filmmaker in Africa and the world to tell their stories and exhibit their arts. I cannot tell you how phenomenal that is.

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