• Taylor Armstead

Culture Spotlight Featuring Niesha Douglas


Dr. Niesha Douglas is an educator, author and writer. Dr. Douglas has over 15 years experience in higher education and over 6 years experience in community development. Niesha is a community activist that believes in giving back to the community that helped her grow and develop into a professional and leader. She was born and raised in Greensboro, NC. She has served in a multitude of roles as she continues to challenge and push herself to be greater through her writing and creativity. Though she is an educator by training, she enjoys reading and writing screenplays. Niesha is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, NC. Her passion is teaching and speaking to youth about personal and social development. She believes in living your best life through creativity and honesty.


Tell us about your experience at the Hip Hop Film Festival. This was my first experience at the Hip Hop Film Festival, and it was great! I met so many different people and made some connections. Though I wasn't able to fully immerse myself into the festival, I still was able to catch some interviews. I think this film festival is a great place for black and brown writers to create and communicate.


Why are stories from the culture important? Stories from the culture are important because it's necessary. For so long, black culture was either underrepresented or misrepresented in film and television. Now is the time for us to show the world, how imaginative and creative we are. Black people have always been viewed as monolithic, but we are not, though we share the same plight. Our stories need to be heard, viewed and understood. "We rock, we don't stop!"


What projects are you working on now? Right now I am working on a sci-fi movie script that I hoped to be picked up by a production company soon as well as another pilot.


Why do you think the Harlem Film House and Hip Hop Film Festival are important? The Harlem Film House is important because it historically represents Harlem. The Harlem Renaissance was just a pivotal point Black American history. It was during this time that the United States recognized how talented and creative we were. The question should be "Why not the Harlem Film House"?



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